Go Back Report # 903
06-30-1947

06-30-1947  

Note: I’ve settled on this date, not because it’s right, but because most references using this case use that date. However, “the end of June” does not necessarily mean “the last day” of June. The approximate distance to the “Straits of Madagascar”1 from Mombasa is roughly 850 miles. The ship’s speed is between 14 to 16 knots, which means that it would have taken two days plus one to four hours to reach that point, making the first few days of July logical. -CF-           

THE LARGEST SAUCER EVER OBSERVED     

       Numerous saucer sightings have been made in Australia and reported to the Australian Flying Saucer Magazine, which, like its American counterparts, is engaged in trying to solve the great riddle of the age.

       The magazine also published sightings from all over the world. The May 1953 issue contained a most unusual one from Mrs. A. M. King of P.O. Box 2162, Nairobi, Africa. While enroute to Capetown on the S.S. Llandovery Castle at the end of June 1947 Mrs. King observed a spectacular sighting. It occurred at approximately 11 P.M. The object was sighted as the ship was going through the Straits of Madagascar.

       “We noticed a particularly bright star. It was traveling very fast and approached the ship. Suddenly, a searchlight appeared which flashed a strong beam of light on the water within 50 yards of the ship. It descended, its beam shortening and becoming brighter as it neared the water, and the next instant there was no more light, but an object appeared, apparently made of steel and shaped like a cigar cut at the rear end. It remained in the air about 20 feet above the sea, parallel with the Llandovery Castle and traveling in the same direction.

       "Gaining a little in speed, after a second or two, the whole shape disappeared without a sound, from the rear issuing fierce flames which shot out to about half the length of the object. It appeared that there must be something like a huge furnace inside the thing, but still we could hear no noise from the flames. No windows could be seen, only a band of metal around the entire thing, which, if it had been a complete cigar-shape, would have been centrally located.

       “The object was very large, about four times the length of the Llandovery Castle and, at a rough guess, about four times as high. We had a wonderful view, but in a few seconds it disappeared. No light was seen forward as it left; it just vanished soundlessly in the darkness... One of the ship's officers with a few passengers... had seen the same thing... To my surprise, I read later of Capt. Bicknell's experience over Mt. Kilimanjaro in 1951 (see CSI Bulletin, No. 2, 1953) and saw the exact shape in an illustration of what I had seen and drawn previously for my husband and several friends."                                                                                                        

Reference: Civilian Saucer Investigation, Quarterly Bulletin, Los Angeles, Calif., Vol. 1, No. 3, July 1953. With thanks to Project 1947: http://www.projectl947.com/shg/csi/csivl-3.html           

ALSO  

Undated news clip from Blue Book Files

Note: This Blue Book report matches the Flying Saucer Review, Vol. 9, No. 3, May/June 1963 to the word. –CF-

The Llandovery Castle Mystery       

       The report of what is believed to be the largest saucer ever observed reached the Australian Flying Saucer Bureau from Nairobi, East Africa. Eyewitness, Mrs. A. M. King of P.O. Box 2162, Nairobi, wrote:  

       "I left Mombassa at the end of June 1947 on the SS Llandovery Castle en route to Cape Town, and going through the Straits of Madagascar about the beginning of July was on deck with another lady passenger at approximately 11 p.m. when we noticed a particularly bright star. It was travelling very fast and approached the ship. Suddenly a searchlight appeared which flashed a strong beam of light on the water within fifty yards of the ship. It descended, its beam shortening and becoming brighter as it neared the water, and the next instant there was no more light, but an object appeared, apparently made of steel and shaped like a cigar cut at the rear end. It remained in the air about twenty feet above the sea, parallel with the Llandovery Castle and travelling in the same direction.”

       "Gaining a little in speed, after a second or two the whole shape disappeared without a sound, from the rear end issuing fierce flames which shot out to about half the length of the object. It appeared that there must be something like a huge furnace inside the thing, but still we could hear no noise from the flames. No windows could be seen, only a band of metal around the entire thing which, if it had been a complete cigar shape, would have been centrally situated.”

       "The object was very large, about four times the length of the Llandovery Castle and, at a rough guess, four times as high.

       “We had a wonderful view, but in a few seconds it had disappeared. No light was seen forward on it as it left; it just vanished soundlessly in the darkness. For a while we thought we were the only ones on deck at that late hour, but walking to the prow of the ship, we saw there one of the ship's officers with a few passengers, the entire party of whom had seen the same thing. Whether it is recorded in the ship’s log, I know not."

       “The story I related to my husband and friends, but without them showing any enthusiasm. I let the matter drop, and to my surprise read later of Captain Bicknell's experience over Mount Kilimanjaro in 1951, and saw the exact shape in an illustration of what I had seen and drawn previously for my husband and several friends.”

       Mrs. King’s sketch of the object enclosed with her report tallies in most major respects with a sketch of the object seen by Captain Bicknell and others over Mt. Kilimanjaro in February 1951, the only perceptible differences being that Mrs. King’s reported object did not possess a rear fin as did the Bicknell object, nor did it possess any more than one dark encircling band about its middle. The Bicknell object had several bands encircling its middle.                                                

This reference: Undated news clip in Blue Book files. BBA Roll ID: NARA-PBB2, Alt Roll ID: NARA-T1206, Frame No.: 114. With thanks to Blue Book Archive at:

http://www.bluebookarchive.org/page.aspx?PageCode=NARA-PBB2-114     

UFOCAT PRN – 11815 [DOS: 06-30-1947]

UFOCAT URN – NONE  Australian Flying Saucer Magazine, May 1953
UFOCAT URN – NONE  Civilian Saucer Investigation, Quarterly Bulletin, Los Angeles, Calif.,
                                        Vol. 1, No. 3, July 1953.
UFOCAT URN – NONE  Flying Saucer Review, Vol. 9, No. 3, May/June 1963, p. 12
UFOCAT URN – 11815 Flying Saucers – Serious Business by Frank Edwards, p. 30, © 1966
UFOCAT URN – NONE  Strange World by Frank Edwards, p. 30, © 1969
UFOCAT URN – NONE  UFOs: A History. Volume 1: July 1947 - December 1948 by Loren
                                        Gross, p. 24, ©1982
UFOCAT URN – 11816 Catalog Through 1950 by H. Edward Hill, #152, © date unknown
UFOCAT URN – 11814 Ted Bloecher investigation files
UFOCAT URN – NONE  Undated news clip in Blue Book files. BBA Roll ID: NARA-PBB2, Alt Roll
                                       ID: NARA-T1206, Frame No.: 114. With thanks to Blue Book Archive at:
                                 http://www.bluebookarchive.org/page.aspx?PageCode=NARA-PBB2-114
UFOCAT URN – NONE  Flying Saucer Review, Vol. 64, No. 4, pp. 17-20           

UFOCAT PRN – 13114 [DOS: 07-??-1947]

UFOCAT URN – 13114 Computerized Catalog (N=3173), #0097 by L. Schoenherr, no © date.

UFOCAT PRN – 13107 [DOS: 07-EE-1947]

UFOCAT URN – 13107 Flying Saucers: The Startling Evidence of the Invasion from Outer
                                        Space by C. Lorenzen p. 18, © 1966          

Africa – Body of water – The Mozambique Channel1

Nairobi                         Latitude 01-16-60 S, Longitude 36-49-00 E (King’s home town) (D-M-S)

Cape Town                  Latitude 33-55-00 S, Longitude 18-25-00 E

Mombasa, Kenya         Latitude 04-02-60 S, Longitude 39-40-00 E [Also spelled Mombassa]

Reference: http://geonames.usgs.gov/pls/gnis/web_query.gnis_web_query_form 

Straits of Madagascar1 - Not found, however, if the ship were heading south to Cape Town, it would pass by Madagascar and Mozambique through the “Mozambique Channel” which is roughly Latitude 15° S, Longitude 43° E. –CF–          

SHIP:

Launched: 04 July 1925, Status: Scrapped – 1953. Photo of ship:

http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=4067            

She was decommissioned in September of 1946 and during her wartime career travelled 250,000 miles and carried nearly 38,000 wounded. After refit she resumed once more on the round Africa service making her first voyage in May of 1947. Her career came to an end when she arrived back in London on the 15th December 1952.

http://www.merchantnavyofficers.com/unioncastle3.html      

General information

http://www.maritimematters.com/union-castle.html  

General information

http://www.union-castle-line.com/home.htm


 



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