Go Back Report # 1318

??-??-1846

GLM1 — Low-Level Meteor-Like Objects         

X3. 1846. Rangoon River, Burma. “It was about half-past seven in the evening, and then quite dark, when suddenly, without any warning, a tremendous sheet of light appeared to rush across the bows of the vessel in a horizontal direction. The light was not like lightning, but appeared to pass swiftly along, and had the aspect of a thick red flame, occupying the whole space left visible between the awning1 and the ship. The suddenness and terrific nature of the glare was such that she fell down upon the deck, believing, as she expresses it, that the world had come to an end, while the child screamed aloud with terror. As this frightful luminous appearance rushed by the ship a considerable accession of heat was felt by both the adult persons, and a strong sulphurous smell also accompanied it, though how long this feature lasted cannot now be stated with any certainty. But the phenomenon was unaccompanied by any sound, and sped noiselessly on; nor could they see where it went, or what finally be­came of it. The whole affair lasted but some seconds, the light having dashed past them with a speed only inferior to lightning." (R3)

Reference R3: Collingwood, C.; "On a Remarkable Phenomenon Observed at Rangoon," Philosophical Magazine, 4:35:61, 1868. (X3)       

Reference for the above text is: Remarkable Luminous Phenomena in Nature: A Catalog of Geophysical Anomalies compiled by William R. Corliss, pp. 279-280 & 286, ©2001.   

UFOCAT PRN - 181649

UFOCAT URN – 181649 Remarkable Luminous Phenomena in Nature: A Catalog of Geophysical Anomalies compiled by William R. Corliss, pp. 279-280 & 286, ©2001

Southern Asia – Myanmar (Burma), Yangon

Rangoon River   Latitude 16-29-32 N, Longitude 096-20-43 E (D-M-S)

Reference: http://geonames.nga.mil/ggmaviewer/    

Note 1: awning:

1624, origin uncertain (first recorded use is by Capt. John Smith), perhaps from M.Fr. auvans pl. of auvent "a sloping roof," "itself of doubtful etym[ology]" (OED). Nautical term until sense of "cover for windows or porch" emerged 1852.

Reference: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=awning

 



Print this Page