Go Back Report # 1226

10-19-1890

 

     Almost three years later, the bark “Edward L. Mayberry,” Captain E. M. Knight commanding, was cruising in latitude 37º 27’ N., longitude 70º 55’ W., near Cape Cod, Massachusetts. At 10 A.M., October 19, 1890, the wind was blowing from southwest to west-northwest at seven knots. As the ship was passing through heavy squalls, "a very large meteor from the west fell close under the stern of the vessel, just clearing the ship, and ploughed through the water at a dreadful rate, a strong smell of sulphur filled the atmosphere, and a number of the crew were greatly affected, and overcome." 14

     It sounds more like a torpedo than a meteor. But the sulphuric smell was there.

 

Note 14: Extract from the ship's log to the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office, dated November 3, 1890 (National Archives, Washington, D.C.).

 

Reference for the above text is: Mysteries of the Skies by Gordon I. R. Lore and Harold H. Deneault, pp. 46-47, © 1968.

 

Note: a very large meteor…fell close under the stern of the vessel” and yet did not cause a wave to swamp the ship? –CF-

 

UFOCAT PRN – 79595

UFOCAT URN – 79595 Mysteries of the Skies by Gordon I. R. Lore and Harold H. Deneault, pp. 46-47, © 1968

UFOCAT URN – 65008 Computer Catalog of Type 9 Cases (N=150) by Brad Sparks, no date

 

North America – United States, Massachusetts, Barnstable

Cape Cod    Latitude 41-42-00 N, Longitude 070-01-58 W (D-M-S)

Reference: http://geonames.usgs.gov/pls/gnispublic/f?p=139:1:584016604572706



 



Print this Page