Go Back Report # 119
03-24-1955

03-24-1955  
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

More about UFOs and the Sea by Antonio Ribera (Extract)
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

Cardiganshire Sightings
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

       Then, in my friend Gavin Gibbons's book The Coming of the Space Ships, 2 I found some very interesting marine sightings, which gave ample food for thought …I quote from page 114 of the book: "We move to Wales for our last example, but one of the erratic behaviour of this strange object--- to the coast of Cardiganshire, to be precise. It was at 7:15 p.m. that Mrs. Harding, a farmer's wife of Aberarth, was called outside by her young daughter, who was pointing excitedly at the evening sky. She gazed out over the sea in the direction that Rosalyn, her daughter, indicated. There, to the northwest of where they stood, and well out to sea, was a large orange ball giving out a black trail and zigzagging downwards. They remarked that it looked very like the sun except for the movement and the long, black, smoky trail that streamed out behind. As they watched, it exploded and, still in the shape of an orange ball, plunged into the sea. The strange thing was that they could still see it glowing beneath the surface of the water [italics mine-Author], and this continued for upwards of an hour after the object finally struck. The trail that it had left behind changed from black to grey before it dispersed; neither of the two watchers had heard any sound from the ball, either in the air or in the sea.
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

Object off Merionethshire Coast
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

       "It is due to the kindness of Mrs. Rhoda Harding that I managed to obtain the information I required concerning the last sighting of this 'meteor' series [strange meteor indeed!--Author]. She very kindly made a special journey to Roshlefain, a village near Towyn in Merionethshire, to interview for me the two witnesses concerned, and I should like to record my gratitude to her.

       "Angelo and Salvatore Tornabene are, as may be assumed by their names, Italians and they work on the land in this pleasant corner of Wales. They are not very sure of the time but think it was about 8 p.m. when they saw the bright orange object zigzagging down into the sea off Rhoslefain. (The date was March 24, 1955.) They could not distinguish its shape or size, but confirm that it gave off a dark trail, like smoke, that became lighter in colour as it got lower. Suddenly the object stopped giving off smoke and substituted flame instead, before dropping straight into the sea. But it did not stay in the water for long. Almost at once it shot up into the sky again, this time leaving a grey trail behind it. It then shot northwards at great speed, leaving no trace in the water. . . Of course this sighting may have been identical with that (at Aberarth) of Mrs. Harding."     
       Gavin Gibbons quotes another witness of the events of this remarkable day. He is a Mr. Hughes of Montford, near Shrewsbury (see page 112), "a countryman possessed of a retentive memory and a remarkable accuracy of explanation." We read that: "He was on his way . . . to his club at Shrawardine ... when suddenly their attention (a lad was with him at the time) was drawn by a brilliant light in the sky, yellowy-white in colour, which was approaching from the direction of Shrewsbury. As it came nearer they were amazed to see a sort of disc of many different colours form around a central ball of light. This disc began to rotate at great speed round the golden centre piece, while the whole mass of the object continued to flash across the heavens. . .  It had made no sound at all and left a white trail which lasted about twenty minutes after it had disappeared."     
       I have quoted this sighting at some length because it is unmistakably a "saucer-type" sighting, and its connection with the marine sightings quoted above must be emphasized. As Mr. Gibbons writes (page 121): "No meteor has ever been observed to plunge into the sea and shoot out of it again to fly off out of sight. Then again, these objects repeatedly changed course and direction, a thing that is quite impossible for any meteor."          
       Elsewhere in his text Mr. Gibbons referred to a fourth craft which appeared on the scene half an hour later. Quite slow by comparison, it moved westwards, rather to the south of the others, to appear as an orange ball before dropping into Cardigan Bay some 30 miles north of Fishguard, in a mass of dark smoke and flames. Like the object in the first report, it glowed under the water;it did not rise again. 
       Gavin Gibbons believes that there were four objects over that part of Great Britain (Staffordshire, Shropshire and North Wales) on the night in question, in addition to others reported from places as far apart as Cornwall, Newcastle and Glasgow. The first of these was a cigar-shaped object (mother-ship?) travelling north-east. I speculate that on this particular
night, a big reconnaissance operation took place, maybe of submarine bases off the coast of Scotland.         
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

Note 2: Gavin Gibbons, The Coming of the Space Ships, Neville Spearman, London, Second Impression, January 1958.                                                                                                                 

This reference: Flying Saucer Review, Vol. 11, No. 6, November/December 1965        
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

The following UFOCAT all have the same references, although divided into separate cases.

UFOCAT PRN & URN – 74061 Aberarth

UFOCAT PRN & URN – 74064 Cardigan

UFOCAT PRN & URN – 74062 Rhoslefain

UFOCAT PRN & URN – 74063 Shrewsbury

Flying Saucer Review, Vol. 11, No. 6, November/December 1965

FSR, Vol. 17, No. 5, p. 29 by Janet Gregory, September 1971

Unexplained Mysteries of the 20th Century by Janet & Colin Bord, p. 165, published 1989

New BUFORA Journal, Issue 3, August 2002

Also

UFOCAT PRN & URN – NONE  UFO’s – The Greatest Mystery by Hilary Evans, p. 85, ©1979
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

Europe – United Kingdom

Aberarth                                  Latitude 52-15 N, Longitude 4-14 W (D-M) [Aber-Arth]

Cardiganshire                          Latitude 52-15 N, Longitude 4-00 W [County]

Merionethshire                         Latitude 52-50 N, Longitude 3-50 W [County]

Shrawardine                            Latitude 52-44 N, Longitude 2-54 W

Cardigan Bay                           Latitude 52-30 N, Longitude 4-25 W

Shropshire                               Latitude 52-04 N, Longitude 2-35 W [County]

Cornwall                                  Latitude 51-56 N, Longitude 1-36 W

Glasgow                                   Latitude 55-50 N, Longitude 4-15 W

Fishguard                                 Latitude 52-00 N, Longitude 4-56 W

Shrewsbury                             Latitude 52-43 N, Longitude 2-44 W

New Castle upon Tyne             Latitude 55-00 N, Longitude 1-36 W

Reference: United Kingdom Gazetteer, prepared in the Division of Geography, Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C., April 1950      
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

Roshlefain                                Latitude 52.62 N, Longitude 4.11 W (D.%)

Montford                                  Latitude 52.72 N, Longitude 2.87 W

Towyn                                      Latitude 52.57 N, Longitude 4.09W [variant – Tywyn]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_Kingdom_locations:_Aa-Ak        
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

North Wales

North Wales is the most northern region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales and to the east by England.  
<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

Definition of shire:

1) A former administrative district of England; equivalent to a county

2) A shire is an administrative area of Great Britain and Australia .

3) English county.       

<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

 



Print this Page